Judy Rivard - Sawicki Real Estate


As a first-time home seller, it is important to avoid shortcuts. By doing so, this home seller may be better equipped than others to reduce the risk of accepting a "lowball" offer on his or her residence.

A lowball offer is something that every home seller would like to avoid. Yet a home seller who lacks real estate knowledge and insights may struggle to identify a lowball offer, particularly if he or she is listing a residence for the first time.

Ultimately, there is no need for a first-time home seller to settle for a lowball offer. Lucky for you, we're here to teach you how to identify a lowball offer in any real estate market, at any time.

Now, let's take a look at three tips to help a first-time home seller identify and address a lowball offer on his or her residence.

1. Learn About the Housing Market

The housing market often fluctuates, and a real estate sector that favors home sellers today may morph into one that favors homebuyers tomorrow. As such, a first-time home seller should allocate the necessary time and resources to monitor real estate market patterns and trends closely.

To learn about the housing market, it is essential to analyze available houses in your city or town. Furthermore, don't forget to assess available houses that are similar to your own.

Housing market data can provide pivotal insights that a home seller can use to stir up substantial interest in his or her residence. Plus, these insights can help a home seller establish a competitive price for a home, thereby reducing the risk of receiving a lowball offer on his or her house.

2. Understand Your Home's Value

For first-time home sellers who want to avoid lowball offers, a home appraisal is ideal. In fact, a home appraisal can make it simple for a first-time home seller to understand what his or her property is worth based on its current condition.

As part of a home appraisal, a property inspector will assess a house both inside and out. After the appraisal is completed, the inspector will provide a home seller with a report that outlines his or her findings. Then, a home seller can use the report findings to review a house's strengths and weaknesses and complete home improvements as needed.

A home appraisal can help a home seller uncover ways to bolster a house's interior and exterior. In addition, the appraisal can provide insights that highlight a home's true value and help a home seller minimize the risk that he or she will accept a lowball proposal.

3. Collaborate with a Real Estate Agent

A first-time home seller may be uncertain about how to proceed with an offer. Fortunately, real estate agents can provide unparalleled insights into the housing market and help home sellers make informed decisions.

In most instances, a real estate agent is happy to discuss an offer with a home seller. This housing market professional can offer honest, unbiased home selling recommendations to ensure a home seller can differentiate between a lowball offer and a strong proposal as well.

Avoid the danger of accepting a lowball offer on a residence – use the aforementioned tips, and a first-time home seller will be better equipped than ever before to accept the best proposal for his or her house.


Photo by Nattanan Kanchanaprat via Pixabay

If you’re in the market to purchase a home, it can be a confusing process. Interest rates, types of loans and what may apply to you can all sound like a foreign language. It’s always best to have some background knowledge before going to see a mortgage broker to make sure you’re on the same page. Although there are many components to the process, one of the main elements that directly affects you is the type of loan you qualify for. Here’s a quick guide:

  • Land Purchase

You may want to build a home on a specific piece of land. Most banks offer up to 85% of the price of the land for residential and investment purposes.

  • Home Purchase

These loans finance the purchase of a new residential property or home from previous owners. There are many categories: fixed-rate, adjustable-rate, conventional, jumbo, FHA, VA, USDA and bridge. Each one has elements that mortgage brokers use to determine whether you would be a good candidate for that type of loan.

  • Home Construction

If you’re looking to construct your home from the ground up, this is the type of loan you will be considered for. The loan and application process is a little different from a standard home purchase loan. If you want the loan to be included as a part of the total price of the house, the land should have been bought within a year.

  • Home Expansion/Extension

Even if you’re purchasing a home, you may decide you need to expand it. These types of loans work differently if you are purchasing the home, so working with a mortgage broker will provide more insight.

These four loan options may directly impact your decision and ability to purchase. When considering the type of loan you are seeking, you should also think about where you want to live and how long you plan to stay there. Each specific type of mortgage loan may require different amounts for a down payment, have different standards, require mortgage insurance and interest.

The type of mortgage loan and interest rate will also affect your monthly payment. A mortgage broker should be able to help choose wisely to save money in a number of areas. The most important thing to remember when searching for a home loan: they are not one size fits all. Every home loan is dependent on your current circumstances, credit rating and income level.

Everything may sound confusing right now, but you have a good foundation to work from. As your mortgage broker walks you through the process, you'll be able to identify those loans that may be mentioned without feeling like you're lost. Being educated on what's out there can also help ask the right questions. Although a mortgage broker is designed to help you get the loan you want, they also want to make money too. Working with one that appreciates your knowledge (even if limited) is key. Good luck!


If you plan to sell a house, you should allocate time and resources to remove clutter from the attic. By doing so, you can show off the true size of your house and increase the likelihood of a fast, profitable home sale.

Ultimately, there are several best practices to help home sellers declutter an attic, and these practices include:

1. Separate Clutter from Items That You Want to Keep

Your attic may be filled with a wide range of items. As a home seller, you'll want to differentiate attic items that you want to keep from those that need to be removed from your home.

With items that you intend to keep, you should package these items safely. Then, you can store these items neatly in your attic. Or, you can move these items into a storage unit.

For home sellers who encounter a massive collection of attic clutter, there is no need to worry. You may be able to sell or donate excess items that work properly and are in great condition. Furthermore, be sure to dispose of any damaged or broken items immediately.

2. Get Plenty of Help

The temptation to tackle attic cleaning on your own may be overwhelming, but it is important to remember that Rome was not built in a day. Thus, if you try to remove attic clutter on your own, you risk myriad problems along the way.

Attic clutter can range from small and lightweight to big and heavy. If you're operating on a strict timeline, you might struggle to quickly get clutter out of your attic if you work alone. And if you're forced to remove large items on your own, there is a risk of injury as well.

When it comes to decluttering an attic, caution is key. As such, you should enlist the help of family members and friends to ensure you can remove attic clutter quickly and safely.

In addition, if you want to avoid the hassle of decluttering your attic, you may want to hire professional help. With friendly, knowledgeable cleaning professionals at your side, you should have no trouble eliminating clutter from your attic.

3. Consult with a Real Estate Agent

Clutter is a major problem in many attics, and few h


If you plan to purchase a house in the foreseeable future, it generally is a good idea to plan ahead for all of your potential homebuying costs. That way, you can secure the funds you need to purchase your dream house.

Now, let's take a look at three costs that every homebuyer needs to consider during the property buying journey.

1. Credit Report

A lender likely will request a verified credit report before it provides you with a mortgage. The fee for a credit report usually is minimal, but it is important to note that this fee adds to the overall cost of purchasing a house.

Oftentimes, a homebuyer can get pre-approved for a mortgage and pay a credit report fee prior to conducting a house search. On the other hand, if a buyer wants to secure financing from a lender after he or she discovers the perfect house, the cost of a credit report may be incorporated into this individual's home closing costs.

2. Home Inspection

A property inspection is crucial, as it ensures a property expert can analyze a house and identify any underlying problems with it before a buyer finalizes his or her home purchase. As such, it is paramount to account for home inspection fees to ensure you have the funds available to hire an inspector who can perform an in-depth evaluation of a house.

The cost of a home inspection varies based on the size of a residence. Meanwhile, there is no need to forgo this evaluation. Because if you ignore a home inspection, you risk encountering costly, time-intensive problems after you buy a residence.

3. Pest or Mold Inspection

A pest or mold inspection is not a requirement if you purchase a new house. Conversely, if you purchase an older residence, it typically is beneficial to inspect it for pests and mold prior to finalizing your house purchase.

Pest or mold inspection costs vary based on a home's size and location. And if you feel a home may be susceptible to pests or mold, you should pay the necessary fees to conduct a pest or mold inspection. Otherwise, you could encounter home pests or mold that may cause major problems down the line.

As you prepare to pursue your dream residence, you may want to hire a real estate agent as well. If you have a real estate agent at your side, you can receive comprehensive guidance as you navigate the homebuying journey.

In addition to teaching you about homebuying costs, a real estate agent is happy to educate you about all aspects of the housing market. Plus, a real estate agent will respond to your homebuying queries and help you make informed decisions as you search for your ideal residence.

When it comes to purchasing a house, it helps to budget accordingly. If you consider the aforementioned homebuying costs, you can craft a homebuying budget and speed up your quest to discover your dream house.



17 Meadowbrook Dr, Hadley, MA 01035

Single-Family

$399,500
Price

8
Rooms
4
Beds
2
Baths
You will Love the pastoral view from the Four Season Sunroom looking East. Cathedral ceiling and skylights complement this beautiful room (2008) Early morning birdsong and the first warming rays of sunlight make this addition so very special in winter. The deck on two sides of the room provides for al fresco dining in summer with the grilling area on the side deck. This well maintained versatile Cape boasts Oil heat on first floor, with a Vermont Casting wood stove for added comfort in winter. Four mini splits provide for individual heating units in Spring and Fall and air conditioning on both living levels in the summertime. Close to the major routes but off the high traffic roads and minutes from UMass. Wood floors throughout. Septic system repaired 12/20 (14K). Low utility bills and low Hadley Taxes.. Roof approx 10 yrs old, Smith boiler.First showing Sat April 17 by appt.
Open House
No scheduled Open Houses






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